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Housing Information

Residential Care Apartment Complexes (RCACs)

Assisted living options are classified as a Residential Care Apartment Complex (RCAC) or "Assisted Living".

An RCAC is a place where five or more adults reside. Apartments must each have a lockable entrance and exit; a kitchen, including a stove (or microwave oven); and individual bathroom, sleeping and living areas.

This living option also provides to persons who reside within the facility, a maximum of no more than 28 hours per week of the following services:

  • Supportive Services: Activities related to general housekeeping, transportation to access community services and recreational activities.
  • Personal Assistance: Services related to activities of daily living, e.g., dressing, eating, bathing and grooming. The most common meal plan utilized by tenants of the RCACs is that consisting of two meals per day. Some provide 3 meals.
  • Nursing Services: Health monitoring, medication administration and medication management
  • Emergency Assistance: An RCAC shall ensure that a tenant’s health and safety are protected in the event of any emergency and shall be able to provide emergency assistance 24 hours a day.

RCACs are not for those persons who have a physician activated Health Care Power of Attorney unless they will reside within an apartment with a competent spouse. RCAC’s are also not for people who are so medically complicated that they require a higher level of daily care. Certified RCACs are inspected annually, via unannounced surveys and complaint investigations.

RCAC DIRECTORY

For more information on RCAC directories and profiles (including citations), please visit:

RCAC Directory


Community Based Residential Facilities

For persons who seek larger congregate setting, a Community Based Residential Facility (CBRF) is a place where five or more adults reside:

  • who are not related to the operator or administrator
  • who do not require care above intermediate level nursing care
  • who receive care, treatment or services that are above the level of room and board, but includes no more than three hours of nursing care per week per resident

CBRFs range in size from 5 to 257 beds.

CBRFs can admit people of Advanced Age, persons with Dementia, Developmental Disabilities, Mental Illness, Physical Disabilities, Traumatic Brain Injury, and/or the Terminally Ill.

The minimum age requirement for residing in a CBRF is 18 years old.

State licensing specialists inspect CBRFs every two years via unannounced surveys. However, a facility may be visited between these inspections if there are any complaints received by the department.

CLASS A Ambulatory (AA) - serves only residents who are ambulatory, mentally and physically capable of responding to an
electronic fire alarm and exiting the facility without any help or verbal or physical prompting.

CLASS A Semi-Ambulatory (AS) - serves only residents who are ambulatory or semi-ambulatory, mentally and physically capable of responding to an electronic fire alarm and exiting the facility without any help or verbal or physical prompting.

CLASS A Non-Ambulatory (ANA) - serves residents who are ambulatory, semi-ambulatory or non-ambulatory but only if they are mentally and physically capable of responding to an electronic fire alarm and exiting the facility without any help or verbal or physical prompting.

CLASS C Ambulatory (CA) - serves only residents who are ambulatory but one or more of whom are not mentally capable of responding to an electronic fire alarm and exiting the facility without any help or verbal or physical prompting.

CLASS C Semi-Ambulatory (CS) - serves only residents who are ambulatory or semi-ambulatory but one or more of whom are not physically or mentally capable of responding to an electronic fire alarm and exiting the facility without help or verbal or physical prompting.

CLASS C Non-Ambulatory (CNA) - serves only residents who are ambulatory, semi-ambulatory or non-ambulatory but one or more of who are not physically or mentally capable of responding to an electronic fire alarm and exiting the facility without help or verbal or physical prompting.

For more information on CBRF directories and profiles (including citations), please visit:

CBRF Directory


Adult Family Homes

For persons who seek small congregate care settings, Adult Family Homes (AFHs) are designed to house up to four persons.

An AFH is defined as "a place where one to four adults who are not related to the operator reside and receive care, treatment or services that are above the level of room and board and that may include up to seven hours per week of nursing care per resident."

AFHs can admit people of Advanced Age, persons with Dementia, Developmental Disabilities, Mental Health Problems, Physical Disabilities, Traumatic Brain Injury, and/or the Terminally Ill.

The minimum age requirement for residing in an AFH is 18 years.

State licensing specialists inspect AFHs every two years, via unannounced surveys. However, a facility may be visited between these inspections if there are any complaints received.

For more information on AFH directories and profiles (including citations), please visit:

Adult Family Homes


Nursing Homes

To learn more about Nursing Home regulations and to compare facilities go to:

Regulations

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